Yours truly.

Yours truly.



Thoughts on deployment (post 6)

I really appreciate this experience. Every day I’m living a risk but every day I’m grateful. I’ve been in this country for two months. I’d say they went by fast. I’ve worked every day but one in these two months. Some days I’m more tired than others but I have no choice but to keep pushing. Keep working to keep myself sane and to come home. I miss my husband all the time but I know I’ll be home soon.

"Hope is a good thing. Maybe the best of things and no good thing ever dies."

(77% left of deployment)



85% left of deployment

85% left of deployment



Thoughts on deployment (post 4) 



90% left of deployment

Thoughts on deployment (post 4)

90% left of deployment



L

L



I’m counting on you, Lord. Please don’t let me down.
Janis Joplin


The iPod, like the Walkman cassette player before it, allows us to listen to our music wherever we want. Previously, recording technology had unlinked music from the concert hall, the café, and the saloon, but now music can always be carried with us. Michael Bull, who has written frequently about the impact of the Walkman and the iPod, points out that we often use devices to ‘aestheticize urban space.’ We carry our own soundtrack with us wherever we go, and the world around us is overlaid with our music. Our whole life becomes a movie, and we can alter the score for it over and over again: one minute it’s a tragedy, and the next it’s an action film. Energetic, dreamy, or ominous and dark: everyone has their own private movie going on in their heads, and no two are the same….Theodor Adorno… called this situation ‘accompanied solitude,’ a situation where we might be alone, but we have the ability via music to create the illusion that we are not.
from How Music Works, by David Byrne (via 1800blergh)

(Source: girlfromtralfamadore)



Thoughts on deployment (post 3)

People are so inspiring. I started following this sergeant on IG and she was deployed for 19 months. NINETEEN MONTHS. I’m sure it had a lot to do with her MOS (job) being a real necessity but that’s a long time. I’ve never heard of a deployment being that long. The longest I’d heard was 12 months. If she can do nineteen months, I can do nine. There’s still not much to do since my people still aren’t here. Lawd, why did they send me here early. The Lord has his timing though. Afghanistan is a whole different world. Thank God I never took anything for granted. This will be a rude awakening for some people though. Can’t wait to get back to the states but Lord knows it’s a little while from that.
(95% left of deployment)



18,505 plays



(Source: trvvsh)



I’ve been waiting for this moment all my life.


Listening to Tegan and Sara reminds me of my teenage years and all of the dumb emotions that come with it



Thoughts on deployment (post 2)

I’ll have been in Afghanistan one week tomorrow. Every day is pretty relaxed. This is only because my unit still isn’t here. The only people that are here from my unit are a 1Lt, SSG, and myself. They’re pretty cool because I’ve worked with them each before. We catch buses to get where we’re going on our FOB. It’s not so bad here. I met a local yesterday whose name is John. He’s super nice. I was looking at his pictures on the wall in his electronic/video shop and they were of him and soldiers all throughout the years since he was seventeen and he must be at least thirty something now it looks. I’m not going to lie, every time deployment came up, I’d think who can I even trust over there? Because you walk around and you see a lot of people from Afghanistan and other countries as well. Most of them are just trying to make a living like the rest of us. I just know not to let my guard down.

(97% left of deployment)